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Criminal Justice Joint Inspection
Thursday, 30 January 2014 00:00

A joint inspection of the treatment of offenders with learning disabilities within the criminal justice system - phase 1 from arrest to sentence

CJJI

 

The needs of many people with learning disabilities are going unnoticed when they are arrested by police, go to court and are sentenced, according to independent inspectors. Today they published the report of a joint inspection into people with learning disabilities within the criminal justice system which said their needs should be recognised and addressed.

The report, A joint inspection of the treatment of offenders with learning disabilities within the criminal justice system: phase 1 from arrest to sentence, reflects the findings of HM Inspectorate of Probation, HM Inspectorate of Constabulary, HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate and the Care Quality Commission. The inspection covered activity at police stations, the prosecution and court process, pre-sentence report preparation and the assessment and planning undertaken at the start of the community order.

No clear definition or agreement exists across criminal justice and health organisations about what constitutes learning difficulties or disabilities. Although believed to be a sizeable minority, possibly as high as 30%, there is no way of knowing the number of people with such conditions within the criminal justice system. Adequate provision is, consequently, not always made by the agencies involved to cater for their specific needs.

To read more and download the report follow this link:

http://www.hmic.gov.uk/news/news-feed/offenders-with-learning-disabilities/

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 30 January 2014 18:35
 
SCIE Report 66: Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards: putting them into practice
Sunday, 06 October 2013 15:19

This resource describes good practice in the management and implementation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/reports/report66.pdf

Last Updated on Sunday, 06 October 2013 15:24
 
Strengthening the Commitment - Paperclip Challenge 2013

Strengthening the Commitment to Modernsing Learning Disability Nursing

Nursing professionals from across the UK to attended a dedicated conference in the Midlands on 20th September 2013

Nursing practitioners and fellow professionals in the field of Learning Disability Nursing came together at a national conference in the Midlands on Friday 20th September to share best practice in implementing the aims and aspirations of a key government report.  The conference called Strengthening the Commitment – Paperclip Challenge 2013 and was held at The Public, a state-of-the-art venue on New Street in West Bromwich.

Learning Disabilities Nursing has changed dramatically in the course of a generation; from an old model of institutionalised care to a more inclusive model where the focus is on individual support enabling independence, inclusion and empowerment.  At the same time, more children born with learning disabilities are now living longer; into adolescence, adulthood and older age.  These changes present new challenges to nursing practitioners, which the chief nursing officers of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland sought to address in a joint report, published in 2012.

'Strengthening the Commitment', the Report of the UK Modernising Learning Disabilities Nursing Review was originally prepared for NHS audiences.  The conference sought to ensure that best practice is shared across the learning disabilities nursing profession to enable
members from all sectors to create a critical mass of leaders, working together to effect change and act as advocates for the profession and those they serve.

Attendees at the conference enjoyed presentations and workshops from a range of key professionals from both the public and independent sectors, including Ros Moore, Chief Nursing Officer Scotland; Debra Moore, Director of Nursing and Patient Safety at Danshell and
Chair of the Independent Sector Collaborative within the Department of Health Steering Group on Strengthening the Commitment; Helen Laverty, Health Lecturer, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham; and Frances Cannon, Senior Professional Officer Northern Ireland Practice Education Council.

Debra Moore, who in addition to being a keynote speaker has helped organise the conference said;

"Strengthening the Commitment – the Paperclip Challenge is about helping to make a difference to the lives of the people who make a difference every day.

"Learning Disability Nursing is immensely rewarding, but it's also very challenging and the nature of what we do as nursing practitioners is changing every day. Opportunities like this conference, to share and help implement best practice across the public and independent sectors, are priceless, so I'm delighted to see so many fellow professionals participating."

For further information, please contact the Press Office on 07885 785145.

Ends

Notes for Editors:

  • Strengthening the Commitment – Paperclip Challenge 2013' took place on Friday 20th September 2013  at The Public, New St, West Bromwich, West Midlands B70 7PG
  • Biographies for the key speakers are available – please contact the Press Office on 07885 785145 or at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  • Approximately 1.5 million people in Britain are living with learning disabilities (Source: Mencap www.mencap.org.uk/all-about-learning-disability/information-professionals/more-about-learning-disability)
  • This figure is set to grow by 14 per cent between 2001 and 2021 (Source: Centre for Disability Research - Emerson E, Hatton C (2008), Estimating Future Need for Adult Social Care Services for People with Learning Disabilities in England
  • The Report, 'Strengthening the Commitment' can be downloaded directly here: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/0039/00391946.pdf
  • Strengthening the Commitment makes clear recommendations designed to help improve learning disabilities nursing, underpinned by four organising principles for supporting reform:

1. Strengthening capacity

2. Strengthening capability

3. Strengthening quality

4. Strengthening the profession

 

Outstanding Contribution to Learning Disability Nursing Award presented to Helen Laverty

The Outstanding Contribution to Learning Disability Nursing Award presented to Helen Laverty by Debra Moore and Ruth Northway


 

 

Friday 20th September 2013StrengtheningTheCommitment

Venue:  The Public, New St, West Bromwich, West Midlands B70 7PG http://www.thepublic.com/

Registrations are now formally closed.

Please direct any communications to:

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

8.00am – 9.00am Coffee and Registration

9.00am – Welcome, Ros Moore, Chief Nursing Officer Scotland and a brief word from LD Nursechat

9.15amOverview from the four countries….

Ben Thomas, Professional Adviser for Mental Health and Learning Disability Nursing, DH

Margaret Serrels, Professional Nurse Advisor for Learning Disabilities, Scottish Government

Frances Cannon, Senior Professional Officer Northern Ireland Practice Education Council

Jenifer French, Nursing Officer for Mental Health and Learning Disability Nursing, Welsh Government

10.15am - Leadership, Learning Disability Nursing and Legacy  with Helen Laverty, Health Lecturer, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham and Debra Moore, MD of Debra Moore Associates

11.15am Coffee break

11.45am -Listen Do Believe - Ruth Northway, Professor of Learning Disability Nursing University of South Wales,

12.15pm - Mental Capacity - Steven Hardy, Consultant Nurse in Learning Disabilities, Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust .

12.45pmMaureen Major QN, Learning Disability Health Facilitator: Nottingham North & East

1.15 – 2.15pm Lunch                                                    

 
Afternoon Workshops are being run and you can choose one workshop from each session, so two in total:
 

Workshops Session One 2.15pm – 3.00pm (choose one)

a) CHANGE – Supporting Parents with a Learning Disability

b) Mark Gray - Identifying Behaviours that indicate Sight loss in people with Learning Disabilities

c) Jane Smith and Anne Cooper – Nursing informatics and the challenges for LD Nurses

Working through some of the ideas about are we comparing apples with apples or apples with pears ….do we know what an apple looks like?  If we don’t think about the information we both generate and use within services we end up working with false assumptions or talking at cross purposes, planning and commissioning the wrong things – all of which have negative impact for service users – so the outcome I want from the workshop is for people to be more aware and go away thinking about how they use or produce service information, what happens to it after they record it, and whether this tells the right story for their service and service users. Nurses feeling more empowered to challenge ‘systems’ if the information they are using or collecting doesn’t make sense.

d) LDNursechat - Building a Network of Support, Social Networking Masterclass

"R/T, Lurking, #FF, DM me”, know what I'm talking about?!? If you don't then you might be missing vital support, advice and new information to enable your clients, your colleagues and your career. Social media is out there and is happening right now, it's a conversation that you can choose to be part of or not, but it is going on with or without you! This workshop will highlight some of the opportunities that Social Media can bring to your practice and will offer some practical activities to get you tweeting! What could be more valuable from a conference than being able to take home your own group of experts in your pocket willing to help at a moment’s notice!

 

Workshops Session Two 3.15pm – 4.00pm (choose one)

e) Advocacy, whose job is it? Kellie Woodley, Project Manager Inclusion North The workshop will show the lessons we have learnt from our North East Advocacy Project looking at self and family advocacy in specialist services, and explore the role of advocacy and whose job is it?

f) Health Equalities Framework, overview and demonstration, Gwen Moulster, Consultant Nurse, Whittington Health and Dave Atkinson, Consultant LD Nurse

g) Overcoming barriers:  building power and influence in your organisation. -  David C Roberts.  David's workshops are fun, highly participative, and thought provoking.  They are designed to accelerate the development of leadership skills, of people and of
organisations.

h) Dave Dawes - Innovation        

 

4.15pm – 5.00pm Awards Presentations followed later by evening entertainment.

 

 
People with learning disability and mental health, behavioural or forensic problems: the role of in-patient services
Wednesday, 24 July 2013 18:54

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has today (23 July) published a report on the role of specialist mental health in-patient services for people with learning disabilities.RCPsych-logo

 

The report, People with learning disability and mental health, behavioural or forensic problems: the role of in-patient services, was commissioned by the College’s Faculty of Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability as a result of the abuse scandal at Winterbourne View Hospital.

 

People with learning disabilities who come into contact with specialist learning disability mental health services often have a complex mix of learning disability, other developmental disorders, mental illnesses, personality disorders, substance misuse, and physical disorders including epilepsy. Sometimes this is associated with challenging behaviour, and at other times not. Most people can be supported in community settings, especially when these are provided in a person-centred, flexible way.  But where there are major risks to the person themselves, or to other people, compulsory treatment under the Mental Health Act can sometimes required. As such, specialist in-patient services can form an essential component of an overall integrated care pathway.

 

The report sets out the different types of specialist in-patient services that are currently provided for people with learning disabilities, and makes a series of key recommendations, including:

  • A choice of both generic mental health and specialist learning disability mental health beds should be available for people with learning disability and mental health or behavioural problems who require acute in-patient treatment.
  • Commissioners and providers of services should plan from day one of admission to in-patient services for the person with learning disability to move back to community services.
  • Good in-patient unit facilities should have multidisciplinary therapeutic input. There should be regular monitoring of this availability.
  • All in-patient units should be able to show evidence of going through an external accreditation process, such as those run by the Royal College of Psychiatrists or an equivalent.
  • All in-patient units should be able to show evidence of a minimum data-set of treatment outcomes, including descriptions of quality of care, measures for effective treatments, appropriate use of medication, patient safety, compliance with the Mental Capacity Act, and patient experience.

Dr Ian Hall, Chair of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Faculty of Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: "In Winterbourne View Hospital, there was an appalling standard of care that no one would condone. Since that time, there has been much debate about the place of specialist in-patient care for people with intellectual disabilities.

"Most people with learning disability will never need to use specialist inpatient services, and improvements in community services will mean that fewer do in the future. The Royal College of Psychiatrists wholeheartedly support the development of better community services, particularly for those with challenging behaviour and other major mental health needs. However, for those people who do require inpatient treatment because of the severity of their mental health, behavioural or forensic problems, it is crucial that they have services of the highest quality with clear treatment goals and outcomes. Care pathways and support must be in place so that people can move safely to community settings promptly as soon as their risk profile allows."

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 July 2013 19:03
 
The Keys to Life: Learning Disability Strategy
Tuesday, 18 June 2013 11:11

Improving quality of life for people with learning disabilities

The 'Keys to life' is the new learning disability strategy for Scotland. It was launched at Murrayfield on Thursday 13th June at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh.

http://www.scld.org.uk/news-events/news/2013/keys-life-learning-disability-strategy